If you’re considering a new career in web design, you may wonder what job titles are common among those in the field. These roles are divided into two categories: design and development. While there are many different titles that Web Designers can have, some are more prominent than others. 

This guide will cover the basics of web design before moving on to common job titles within the field to help you get started. With this information, you can begin to narrow down which title is the best fit for you and your career goals.

What is a Web Designer?

A Web Designer creates the visual aspects of a website. This includes the layout, color scheme, typography, and overall look and feel of a site. In many cases, web designers also handle the front end coding of a site using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

These professionals work with clients to understand their needs and come up with a design that is both user-friendly and visually appealing. In some cases, they may be responsible for creating the branding for a website or company.

Many Web Designers are self-employed and work as freelancers. However, many work full-time for design agencies or in-house for companies. The different employment paths a Web Designer can take make this one of the most versatile careers in the tech industry. There are also considerable opportunities for advancement within the field.

Graphic Designer

Graphic Designers are responsible for creating visual concepts and using graphical elements to communicate ideas that inspire, inform, or captivate consumers. They develop the general layout and production design for applications such as advertisements, brochures, magazines, and corporate reports.

Graphic designers use various design elements to create an aesthetic that is pleasing to the eye and conveys the desired message. Common tools used by graphic designers include Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and InDesign.

Front End Developer

Front End Developers build the user interface and front end logic for websites and applications. They use a variety of programming languages to create the visual elements that users see and interact with on a daily basis. Many Front End Developers also strongly understand user experience (UX) and work closely with designers to create interactive and user-friendly interfaces.

With the responsibilities of a Front End Developer often overlapping with those of a Web Designer, many professionals in the field have a solid understanding of both design and development. This makes Front End Developers some of the most versatile web design team members.

Back End Developer

Back End Developer responsibilities include building and maintaining the server-side infrastructure for websites and applications. They use several programming languages to create the back-end logic that powers the front-end. In many cases, Back End Developers also have a strong understanding of database systems and work closely with database administrators to ensure data is properly stored and accessed.

It takes a lot of work to build a website or application. While Front End Developers and Back End Developers often have different responsibilities, their skillsets are highly complementary. This makes them a crucial part of any web design team.

Full Stack Developer

Full Stack Developers build and maintain both the front and back end of websites and applications. They have a strong understanding of both design and development and can create comprehensive solutions that consider all aspects of the software development process. 

Full Stack Developers typically use a variety of programming languages and frameworks depending on the project requirements. These professionals are often able to work independently and are highly sought-after in the tech industry.

User Experience Designer

User Experience (UX) Designers are responsible for creating intuitive, user-friendly, and enjoyable interfaces for websites and applications. They have a strong understanding of human-computer interaction (HCI) and work closely with developers to create visually appealing and straightforward interfaces. 

In many cases, User Experience Designers also conduct user research to understand users’ needs and identify areas for improvement in existing designs.

User Interface Designer

User Interface (UI) Designers create the visual design of websites and applications. They work closely with developers to create visually appealing interfaces and easy to use. In many cases, User Interface Designers also conduct user research to understand users’ needs and identify areas for improvement in existing designs.

There is often an overlap between the responsibilities of User Interface Designers and User Experience Designers. However, User Interface Designers typically focus on the visual aspects of design while User Experience Designers focus on the overall experience of using a product.

Web Developer

Web Developers are responsible for building and maintaining websites. They use numerous programming languages to create the back-end logic that powers the front end. In many cases, Web Developers are also responsible for creating the front end user interface, though in some cases, this may be handled by a separate team of designers.

You may have noticed that the title “Web Developer” is a bit general. That’s because there are many different types of Web Developers, each with their own specific skillset. Some Web Developers build dynamic websites using server-side scripting languages, while others focus on creating static websites using HTML and CSS.

Art Director

Art Directors are responsible for the all-around visual style of websites and applications. They work closely with designers and developers to create a cohesive look and feel for the product. Art Directors typically have a strong understanding of branding and marketing and work with other team members to ensure that the product appeals to the target audience. 

An Art Director’s job is not only to create a visually appealing product but also to ensure that the product is aligned with the company’s brand identity. This can be challenging, as it requires a balance between creativity and practicality.

Which Job Title is Right for Me?

The job title that is right for you will depend on your skill set and area of interest. Try to reflect on what you are good at and what you enjoy doing. Do you have a strong sense of design? Are you interested in coding? Do you like working with coworkers or prefer to work alone? Once you understand your strengths better, try matching them up with the job titles above. 

If you’re still not sure, try not to stress too much. Many people end up changing roles several times throughout their careers. The most important thing is to find something you enjoy that makes you happy.